A Wicked Pack of Cards

Origins of the Occult Tarot

A Wicked Pack of Cards

Tarot cards were invented in Italy in the early fifteenth century, and for almost four centuries used exclusively for playing games. In late eighteenth-century France, however, they were purloined from the card-players for fortune-telling and the occult. For a hundred years, the use of Tarot cards for divination, and their interpretation as enshrining an occult meaning, remained all but exclusively confined to France. Professional French fortune-tellers, French exponents and practitioners of magic, and the occasional French charlatan, developed uses for Tarot cards and baseless theories about them which were virtually unknown in other countries. The authors trace this phenomenon through the writings and activities of many advocates of Tarot occultism, including Court de Gebelin, Etteilla, Levi, and Papus, showing how an extraordinary variety of occult theories - from Hermetism to Rosicrucianism, from the Cabala to Freemasonry - was brought to bear on a pack of playing cards. In the twentieth century Tarot divination has spread throughout the Western world; the very word 'Tarot' is now identified with the occult, fortune-telling, and cartomancy. This book tells the fascinating story of how Tarot divination was born and grew to maturity in a single country.

A Wicked Pack Of Cards

A Book of Unusual Business Spells

A Wicked Pack Of Cards

A Wicked Pack Of Cards is a poem with a kaleidoscope of different voices. It is a place where a keynote speaker chatters with a green knight; an old God teases a lost businessman with the prospect of a career-changing riddle; and where Europe's most famous Business Magician offers salvation to all those who believe in his wicked pack of cards. Set in no particular time, A Wicked Pack Of Cards asks what might happen in a world after our version of reality ceases to exist. It feels post-apocalyptic. It mixes old stories, traditions and superstitions with the digital fantasies, Venn diagrams and strategies of the commercial world. What would happen if the great business consultants of our time discovered paganism and sorcery? This. This would happen. The poem is made up of thirteen-cards and a riddle. Each one is a spell - a business spell. It will take you down the dark back-alleyways of burnout, depression and imposter syndrome. Yes, A Wicked Pack of Cards is dark; but read carefully, and it will eventually deliver you into the light of optimism and the most powerful spell of all: true love.

Tarot and Other Meditation Decks

History, Theory, Aesthetics, Typology

Tarot and Other Meditation Decks

Hundreds of new Tarot decks have been produced in the late twentieth century, many of them based on the structure and images of Arthur Waite and artist Pamela Smith’s Rider-Waite deck (1910). The continuing popularity and influence of the Rider-Waite deck makes it a standard for identifying, categorizing and analyzing contemporary Tarot and other meditation decks. This work of art history analyzes such decks in relation to conventional art styles and movements, including Symbolism, Surrealism, the modernist “grid” and the low/high value hierarchy, and postmodern art movements and concepts such as the dissolution of the modernist value hierarchy, Pattern and Decoration art, and collage. It also examines them in relation to literary concepts, including the novel, utopias, and popular genres. The author’s analysis is supported by numerous illustrations, including the Rider-Waite major arcana cards juxtaposed with examples of their counterparts from more recent decks.

Gnostic Tarot

Mandalas for Spiritual Transformation

Gnostic Tarot

Gnostic Tarot presents an exciting new path for people who want to use the tarot as a guide for spiritual development. Lee Irwin synthesizes the more traditional forms of interpretation with a new esoteric method based on the contemporary theories of Hermetic and Gnostic spirituality. He has developed ten Mandalas (akin to tarot spreads) for you to use as meditative structures for contemplating the interconnection between the natural elements and consciousness as reflected by the imagery of the cards. Irwin provides a detailed discussion of the esoteric history and structure of the tarot, and explores the symbolism of the Four Suits, The Inner (Minor) Court Cards, and the Major Arcana Cards as illustrated by the Ravenswood and Waite decks. His wellwritten and deeply insightful interpretations of tarot imagery will inspire you to see the sacred in everything surrounding you. By using Irvins Mandalas, mediations, and visualization exercises, you can learn to align your physical, mental, and emotional life with your spiritual growth, to affect an alchemical transformation through the realization of your souls purpose.

The Spiritual Imagination of the Beats

The Spiritual Imagination of the Beats

The Spiritual Imagination of the Beats is the first comprehensive study to explore the role of esoteric, occult, magical, theosophical, Gnostic, Hindu and Buddhist traditions in the work of eleven major Beat authors. The opening chapter discusses Kenneth Rexroth and Robert Duncan as predecessors and important influences on the spiritual orientation of the Beats. David Stephen Calonne draws comparisons throughout the book between the various approaches towards spiritual matters of individual Beat writers - for example, Burroughs registered significant objections to Buddhism, while Ginsberg and Kerouac devoted considerable time to studying Buddhist history and texts. This book also focuses on authors who have often been neglected in Beat studies - Diane di Prima, Bob Kaufman and Philip Whalen. In addition, several understudied works such as Gregory Corso's 'The Geometric Poem' are given close attention. Calonne also introduces important themes from the history of heterodox spirituality - Manicheanism, alchemy and Tarot - and demonstrates how inextricably these ideas shaped the Beat literary imagination.

The Witch's Guide to Life

The Witch's Guide to Life

It''s not always easy to practice the Craft in a nine-to-five world. This comprehensive guide to magickal living spans the intellectual, physical, magickal, and philosophical aspects of being a witch, including spellcasting, the development of the Craft, divination, ethics, and more.

Tarot for Life

Reading the Cards for Everyday Guidance and Growth

Tarot for Life

Paul Quinn transforms the Tarot from fortune-telling into the ultimate self-help tool for intuitive guidance, empowerment, and well-being. Discover how to apply the Tarot, as a lifelong resource, to access inner wisdom and gain deeper insights and practical, inspired guidance in relationships, career, family, and personal growth. With illustrations from the Universal Waite deck, the book offers 78 engaging casebook examples (one for each card) from Quinn’s readings for clients. Drawing on Jungian psychology, the Hindu chakras, and other esoteric traditions, he explains how the Tarot can reveal unconscious patterns and offer soul-directed advice leading to positive changes and greater well-being. Quinn also provides guidelines on reading the cards for oneself and others, interpreting reversed cards, handling difficult disclosures, and psychic self-care.

When Stories Travel

Cross-Cultural Encounters Between Fiction and Film

When Stories Travel

Adapting fiction into film is, as author Cristina Della Coletta asserts, a transformative encounter that takes place not just across media but across different cultures. In this book, Della Coletta explores what it means when the translation of fiction into film involves writers, directors, and audiences who belong to national, historical, and cultural formations different from that of the adapted work. In particular, Della Coletta examines narratives and films belonging to Italian, North American, French, and Argentine cultures. These include Luchino Visconti’s adaptation of James M. Cain’s The Postman Always Rings Twice, Federico Fellini’s version of Edgar Allan Poe’s story "Never Bet the Devil Your Head," Alain Corneau’s film based on Antonio Tabucchi’s Notturno indiano, and Bernardo Bertolucci’s take on Jorge Luis Borges’s "Tema del traidor y del héroe." In her framework for analyzing these cross-cultural film adaptations, Della Coletta borrows from the philosophical hermeneutics of Hans-Georg Gadamer and calls for a "hermeneutics of estrangement," a practice of mediation and adaptation that defines cultures, nations, selfhoods, and their aesthetic achievements in terms of their transformative encounters. Stories travel to unexpected and interesting places when adapted into film by people of diverse cultures. While the intended meaning of the author may not be perfectly reproduced, it still holds, Della Coletta argues, an equally valid and important intellectual claim upon its interpreters. With a firm grasp on the latest developments in adaptation theory, Della Coletta invites scholars of media studies, cultural history, comparative literature, and adaptation studies to deepen their understanding of this critical encounter between texts, writers, readers, and cultural movements.