The Wretched of the Earth

The Wretched of the Earth

Frantz Fanon was one of the twentieth century’s most important theorists of revolution, colonialism, and racial difference, and this, his masterwork, is a classic alongside Orientalism and The Autobiography of Malcolm X. The Wretched of the Earth is a brilliant analysis of the psychology of the colonized and their path to liberation. Bearing singular insight into the rage of colonized peoples and the role of violence in historical change, the book also incisively attacks postindependence disenfranchisement of the masses by the elite on one hand, and intertribal and interfaith animosities on the other. A veritable handbook of social reorganization for leaders of emerging nations, The Wretched of the Earth has had a major impact on civil rights, anticolonialism, and black-consciousness movements around the world. This new translation updates its language for a new generation of readers and its lessons are more vital now than ever.

The Politics of the Earth

Environmental Discourses

The Politics of the Earth

Dryzek provides an accessible introduction to thinking about the environment by looking at the language used to discuss environmental issues. He looks at various approaches which have dominated environmental issues, from faith in unlimited economic growth to radical green politics, and concludes with a plea for ecological democracy.

The Greatest Show on Earth

The Evidence for Evolution

The Greatest Show on Earth

"Charles Darwin's masterpiece, On the Origin of Species, shook society to its core on publication in 1859. Darwin was only too aware of the storm his theory of evolution would provoke. But he would surely have raised an incredulous eyebrow at the controversy still raging a century and a half later. Evolution is accepted as a scientific fact by all reputable scientists and indeed theologians, yet millions of people continue to question its veracity ..."--Publisher description.

From Space to Earth

The Story of Solar Electricity

From Space to Earth

Explores the history of photovoltaics, the direct conversion of the sun's energy into electricity by solar cells, from its 19th-century beginnings to its high-visibility success in the space program to its current position as a versatile power source.

Deforesting the Earth

From Prehistory to Global Crisis

Deforesting the Earth

Since humans first appeared on the earth, we've been cutting down trees for fuel and shelter. Indeed, the thinning, changing, and wholesale clearing of forests are among the most important ways humans have transformed the global environment. With the onset of industrialization and colonization the process has accelerated, as agriculture, metal smelting, trade, war, territorial expansion, and even cultural aversion to forests have all taken their toll. Michael Williams surveys ten thousand years of history to trace how, why, and when human-induced deforestation has shaped economies, societies, and landscapes around the world. Beginning with the return of the forests to Europe, North America, and the tropics after the Ice Ages, Williams traces the impact of human-set fires for gathering and hunting, land clearing for agriculture, and other activities from the Paleolithic through the classical world and the Middle Ages. He then continues the story from the 1500s to the early 1900s, focusing on forest clearing both within Europe and by European imperialists and industrialists abroad, in such places as the New World and India, China, Japan, and Latin America. Finally, he covers the present-day and alarming escalation of deforestation, with the ever-increasing human population placing a possibly unsupportable burden on the world's forests. Accessible and nonsensationalist, Deforesting the Earth provides the historical and geographical background we need for a deeper understanding of deforestation's tremendous impact on the environment and the people who inhabit it.

The Magnetic Field of the Earth

Paleomagnetism, the Core, and the Deep Mantle

The Magnetic Field of the Earth

Topics involved in studies of the Earth's magnetic field and its secular variation range from the intricate observations of geomagnetism, to worldwide studies of archeomagnetism and paleomagnetism, through to the complex mathematics of dynamo theory. Traditionally these different aspects of geomagnetism have been studied and presented in isolation from each other. The Magnetic Field of the Earth draws together these major lines of inquiry into an integrated framework to highlight the interrelationships and thus to provide a more comprehensive understanding of the geomagnetic field.The text is organized so that paleomagnetists and dynamo theoreticians may both benefit from the results and arguments presented by the other. A particular example is the presentation of paleomagnetic results to illuminate the observational constraints on geodynamo theory. Conversely, dynamo theory is explained in such a way that paleomagnetists may utilize it to present their data more effectively. Other important features of the book include a discussion of planetary magnetic fields and their implications for dynamo theory and the most recent set of magnetic charts. This unique integrated approach to the subject will make The Magnetic Field of the Earth an invaluable reference book for all geophysicists, particularly those wishing to gain insight into alternative branches of research.

The Dream of the Earth

The Dream of the Earth

Essays discuss the Earth's evolution, our changing relationship with the planet, the ethics of ecology, and the future of the world

Down to Earth

Nature's Role in American History

Down to Earth

In this ambitious and provocative text, environmental historian Ted Steinberg offers a sweeping history of our nation--a history that, for the first time, places the environment at the very center of our story. Written with exceptional clarity, Down to Earth re-envisions the story of America "from the ground up." It reveals how focusing on plants, animals, climate, and other ecological factors can radically change the way that we think about the past. Examining such familiar topics as colonization, the industrial revolution, slavery, the Civil War, and the emergence of modern-day consumer culture, Steinberg recounts how the natural world influenced the course of human history. From the colonists' attempts to impose order on the land to modern efforts to sell the wilderness as a consumer good, the author reminds readers that many critical episodes in our history were, in fact, environmental events. He highlights the ways in which we have attempted to reshape and control nature, from Thomas Jefferson's surveying plan, which divided the national landscape into a grid, to the transformation of animals, crops, and even water into commodities. The text is ideal for courses in environmental history, environmental studies, urban studies, economic history, and American history. Passionately argued and thought-provoking, Down to Earth retells our nation's history with nature in the foreground--a perspective that will challenge our view of everything from Jamestown to Disney World.

Apollo's Eye

A Cartographic Genealogy of the Earth in the Western Imagination

Apollo's Eye

"Well written, copiously illustrated, and with an excellent section of notes at the end of each chapter, the author and publishers of this book are to be commended." -- Geography

Our Ecological Footprint

Reducing Human Impact on the Earth

Our Ecological Footprint

Our Ecological Footprint presents an internationally-acclaimed tool for measuring and visualizing the resources required to sustain our households, communities, regions and nations, converting the seemingly complex concepts of carrying capacity, resource-use, waste-disposal and the like into a graphic form that everyone can grasp and use. An excellent handbook for community activists, planners, teachers, students and policy makers.