Finding Rest in Meditation

Trilogy of Rest, Volume 2

Finding Rest in Meditation

A new translation of the Tibetan master Longchenpa's famous work that systematically presents the path of meditation according to the Tibetan Dzogchen tradition. Finding Rest in Meditation is the second volume of the Trilogy of Rest, Longchenpa’s classic exposition of the Buddhist path, the purpose of which is to introduce us to our most basic nature—the clear and pristine awareness that is the nature of the mind. According to the traditional format of view, meditation, and action, it is the sequel to Finding Rest in the Nature of the Mind, which establishes the view of the Buddhist path generally, and specifically that of the teachings of the Great Perfection. It precedes the final volume, Finding Rest in Illusion, which focuses on post-meditation yogic conduct. This profound and comprehensive presentation of the Buddhist view and path combines the scholastic expository method with the direct pith instructions designed for advanced practitioners. The Padmakara Translation Group has provided us with a clear and fluid new translation of Finding Rest in Meditation along with its autocommentary, The Chariot of Surpassing Purity. Finding Rest in Meditation outlines the main points of meditation, namely, where one should meditate, what qualities a practitioner should possess and develop, and what should be practiced. Based on the author’s personal experience, these instructions are designed to help stabilize and intensify direct insight into the nature of the mind through meditative practice.

Finding Rest in Illusion

The Trilogy of Rest, Volume 3

Finding Rest in Illusion

A new translation of the Tibetan master Longchenpa's famous work that systematically presents the path of yogic conduct according to the Dzogchen tradition. Finding Rest in Illusion is the third volume of the Trilogy of Rest, Longchenpa’s classic exposition of the Buddhist path. The purpose of these teachings is to introduce us to our most basic nature—the clear and pristine awareness that is the nature of the mind. According to the traditional Tibetan Buddhist formula of view, meditation, and action, this volume follows Finding Rest in the Nature of the Mind, which establishes the view of the Buddhist path generally, and specifically that of the teachings of the Great Perfection, and Finding Rest in Meditation, which outlines the main points of meditation, namely, where one should meditate, what qualities a practitioner should possess and develop, and what should be practiced. The Padmakara Translation Group has provided us with a clear and fluid new translation of the final volume of the trilogy, Finding Rest in Illusion, along with its autocommentary, The Chariot of Excellence, both intended to elucidate the appropriate action of a Buddhist practitioner. Finding Rest in Illusion describes in detail the conduct of those who have stabilized their recognition of the nature of the mind and how to apply the Buddhist view when relating to ordinary appearances. Drawing extensively from classic Buddhist works, the author uses well-known examples of illusion found throughout Mahāyāna literature to illustrate the illusory nature of both saṃsāra and nirvāṇa, thus revealing their ultimate nondual nature. This is an invaluable manual for any genuine student of Buddhism who wishes to truly find rest through the path of the Great Perfection.

Finding Rest in the Nature of the Mind

Trilogy of Rest, Volume 1

Finding Rest in the Nature of the Mind

A new translation of Longchenpa's famous work that presents the entire scope of the Buddhist view combined with pith instructions pointing out the nature of one's mind. Longchenpa’s classic Buddhist manual for attaining liberation teaches us how to familiarize ourselves with our most basic nature—the clear, pristine, and aware mind. Written in the fourteenth century, this text is the first volume of Longchenpa’s Trilogy of Rest, a work of the Tibetan Dzogchen tradition. This profound and comprehensive presentation of the Buddhist view and path combines the scholastic expository method with direct pith instructions designed for yogi practitioners. This first part of the Trilogy of Rest sets the foundation for the following two volumes: Finding Rest in Meditation, which focuses on Tibetan Buddhist meditation practice, and Finding Rest in Illusion, which focuses on post-meditation yogic conduct. The Padmakara Translation Group has provided us with a clear and fluid new translation to Finding Rest in the Nature of the Mind along with selections from its autocommentary, The Great Chariot, which will serve as a genuine aid to study and meditation. Here, we find essential instructions on the need to turn away from materialism, how to find a qualified guide, how to develop boundless compassion for all beings, along with the view of tantra and associated meditation techniques. The work culminates with pointing out the result of practice as presented from the Dzogchen perspective, providing us with all the tools necessary to traverse the Tibetan Buddhist path of finding rest.

Finding Your Way In A Wild New World

Four steps to fulfilling your true calling

Finding Your Way In A Wild New World

Many people wonder how they got where they are and what they should do now. They feel called to help others and change the world but they just don't know how. Too often, they end up stuck in careers and relationships that don't fit. Now, in Finding Your Way In A Wild New World, popular life coach Martha Beck shows readers how to find their true selves and extend healing to everyone and everything around them. She identifies this growing body of people as wayfinders. Drawing on her coaching expertise and her extraordinary experiences in the South African bush, Martha leads her readers through four magical and practical steps to awaken them to a new way of living in the 21st century.

The Idealist Illusion and Other Essays

Translation and Introduction by Fiachra Long, Annotations by Fiachra Long and Claude Troisfontaines

The Idealist Illusion and Other Essays

I was very happy when in 1997 Fiachra Long came to spend part of his sabbatical leave at the Archives Maurice Blondel at Louvain-Ia-Neuve. This allowed him to bring together and complete his translation of three important articles from Maurice Blondel, known as the philosopher of Aix-en-Province. These three articles fonn a unity: they make explicit certain aspects of the method used in the great thesis of 1893, Action. This thesis, it is well known, aroused many polemic debates after its appearance. Thomist theologians accused Blondel of turning back towards Kantian idealism whereas the philosophers of the Revue de metaphysique et de morale accused him on the contrary of falling back on a pre-critical realism. The three articles translated here, each in its own way, attempt to pass beyond these two opposite charges. The Idealist Illusion (1898) underlines the fact that the content of consciousness should be unfurled as it appears, by withdrawing from any idealist or realist prejudice, before judging the consistency of its content as a whole. In this way Blondel supports the "phenomenological" method used in his thesis. The Elementary Principle of a Logic of the Moral Life (1903) is a very well-worked text which shows that "the logic of possession and privation" is broader than "the logic of amnnation and negation. " Using these words, Blondel develops certain striking laws of action such as that of the "parallelogram of contrary forces.