A History of Indian Buddhism

From Śākyamuni to Early Mahāyāna

A History of Indian Buddhism

This comprehensive and detailed survey of the first six centuries of Indian Buddhism sums up the results of a lifetime of research and reflection by one of Japan's most renowned scholars of Buddhism.

Indian Buddhism

A Survey with Bibliographical Notes

Indian Buddhism

This work presents a survey of Indian Buddhism with detailed bibliographical notes. Besing itself on recent studies, it is intended to introduce studies in various aspects of Indian Buddhism carried on by Japanese scholars as well as Western and Asian, especially Indian, scholars. The main text constitutes a gengeral survey of the development of Indian Buddhism, and studies by scholars past and present are mentioned in full detail in copious footnotes with due evaluations. This work can be regarded, so to speak, as a development with revisions, of the Buddhist portion of M. Winternitz` History of Indian Literature. Major studies before and after Winternitz` work are exhaustively mentioned. As a reference work also this book is of extreme help to scholars and students alike. The work has been edited by Prof. Ramesh Mathur. Contents Foreword, Preface, I. General Survey of Buddhism, II. early Buddhism: 1. The Time of the Rise of Buddhism, 2. The Life of Gotama Buddha and his Disciples, The Scriptures of Early Buddhism, Aspects of Original Buddhism, The Thought of Early Buddhism, The Practice of Early Buddhism, The Worship of Buddhas and Faith, Social Thought, III. Conservative Buddhism and Transition to Mahayana: Historical background, Philosophical Schools, Philosophical Thought, Biographies of the Buddha, The Poet Asvaghosa and his school, The Avadana Literature, IV. Mahayana Buddhism: Historical Background, Mahayana Sutras, The Philosophical Schools of Mahayana, V. Logicians: Before Dignaga, Dignaga, Dharmakirti, Logicians at the Final Stage, Some Features of Indian Logic, VI. Esoteric Buddhism: the Beginning, Systematization, The Final Stage, Some Features of Esoteric Buddhism, Addenda et Corrigenda, Abbreviations and Periodicals, Index.

Indian Buddhism

Indian Buddhism

This book describes the Buddhism of India on the basis of the comparison of all the available original sources in various languages. It falls into three approximately equal parts. The first is a reconstruction of the original Buddhism presupposed by the traditions of the different schools known to us. It uses primarily the established methods of textual criticism, drawing out of the oldest extant texts of the different schools their common kernel. This kernel of doctrine is presumably common Buddhism of the period before the great schisms of the fourth and third centuries BC. It may be substantially the Buddhism of the Buddha himself, though this cannot be proved: at any rate it is a Buddhism presupposed by the schools as existing about a hundred years after the Parinirvana of the Buddha, and there is no evidence to suggest that it was formulated by anyone other than the Buddha and his immediate followers. The second part traces the development of the 'Eighteen Schools' of early Buddhism, showing how they elaborated their doctrines out of the common kernel. Here we can see to what extent the Sthaviravada, or 'Theravada' of the Pali tradition, among others, added to or modified the original doctrine. The third part describes the Mahayana movement and the Mantrayana, the way of the bodhisattva and the way of ritual. The relationship of the Mahayana to the early schools is traced in detail, with its probable affiliation to one of them, the Purva Saila, as suggested by the consensus of the evidence. Particular attention is paid in this book to the social teaching of Buddhism, the part which relates to the 'world' rather than to nirvana and which has been generally neglected in modern writings Buddhism.

An Archaeological History of Indian Buddhism

An Archaeological History of Indian Buddhism

""Examines Indian Buddhism from its origins in c. 500 BCE, through its ascendance in the first millennium CE and subsequent decline in mainland South Asia by c. 1400 CE"--Provided by publisher"--

Introduction to the History of Indian Buddhism

Introduction to the History of Indian Buddhism

The most influential work on Buddhism to be published in the nineteenth century, Introduction à l’histoire du Buddhisme indien, by the great French scholar of Sanskrit Eugène Burnouf, set the course for the academic study of Buddhism—and Indian Buddhism in particular—for the next hundred years. First published in 1844, the masterwork was read by some of the most important thinkers of the time, including Schopenhauer and Nietzsche in Germany and Emerson and Thoreau in America. Katia Buffetrille and Donald S. Lopez Jr.’s expert English translation, Introduction to the History of Indian Buddhism, provides a clear view of how the religion was understood in the early decades of the nineteenth century. Burnouf was an impeccable scholar, and his vision, especially of the Buddha, continues to profoundly shape our modern understanding of Buddhism. In reintroducing Burnouf to a new generation of Buddhologists, Buffetrille and Lopez have revived a seminal text in the history of Orientalism.

History of Indian Buddhism

From the Origins to the Saka Era

History of Indian Buddhism

The History of Indian Buddhism is undoubtedly Lamotte's most brilliant contribution to the field of Buddhist exegesis. The work contains a vivid, vigorous and fully-detailed description of early Buddhism and its teachings, the material organization of the Community, the formation and further developments of Buddhist writings, the conciliar traditions, the evolution of Buddhist sculpture and architecture, the origins of the sects, the Buddhist dialects and the constitution of the legends, and sets them in the historical background in which buddhist doctrines originated and expanded in India and in neighbouring countries. Using material evidence provided by Indian epigraphy and archaeological remains on the one hand, and taking into account information supplied by Western (Latin and Greek) and Far Eastern (Tibetan and Chinese) sources on the other, Lamotte has succeeded in producing a lucid and basic book that is unanimously considered as a classic of contemporary Buddhist studies. After thirty years, the work has retained all its value, but, in order to meet the requirements of recent Buddhist scholarship, the book has been supplemented with an additional bibliography, an index of technical terms and revised geographical maps.

Origin and Nature of Ancient Indian Buddhism

Origin and Nature of Ancient Indian Buddhism

Description: This book offers a serious exploration of the many different aspects of ancient Indian Buddhism. In the recent past controversy relating to date of the Buddha has been resurrected. The author has discussed this issue in detail and has suggested his own date for the Mahaparinibbana. Buddhist attitude towards women and ahimsa has also been analyzed from a new perspective. The book examines in detail the background to the origin of Buddhism especially the role of iron in it. The issue as to what extent Buddhism was an urban religion has also been discussed. Most of the arguments in the book have been based on extensive data collected from the Pali Tipitaka. This data is provided in the form of appendices at the end of the book.

Manual of Indian Buddhism

Manual of Indian Buddhism

Buddhism is a religion of universal peace and concord. The present book fulfils its aim by placin emphasis on the facts in relation to this aspect of the creed.The book is divided into five sections. Section I is Introductory. It recounts in particular the sacred books of the Buddhists, literature subsidiary to the canon the period of Origin of buddhism and Indian thoughts and ideals contemporaneous with it. Section II deals with the life of Buddha from conception birth the childhood to Parinirvana cremation and partition of the relics.

The Refutation of the Self in Indian Buddhism

Candrakīrti on the Selflessness of Persons

The Refutation of the Self in Indian Buddhism

Since the Buddha did not fully explain the theory of persons that underlies his teaching, in later centuries a number of different interpretations were developed. This book presents the interpretation by the celebrated Indian Buddhist philosopher, Candrakirti (ca. 570–650 C.E.). Candrakirti's fullest statement of the theory is included in his Autocommentary on the Introduction to the Middle Way (Madhyamakavatarabhasya), which is, along with his Introduction to the Middle Way (Madhyamakavatara ), among the central treatises that present the Prasavgika account of the Madhyamaka (Middle Way) philosophy. In this book, Candrakirti's most complete statement of his theory of persons is translated and provided with an introduction and commentary that present a careful philosophical analysis of Candrakirti's account of the selflessness of persons. This analysis is both philologically precise and analytically sophisticated. The book is of interest to scholars of Buddhism generally and especially to scholars of Indian Buddhist philosophy.

A comprehensive history of Indian Buddhism

A comprehensive history of Indian Buddhism

This work, like his great work on Jainism,is a very informative text on the Life and Teachings of Gautama Buddha. It also contains chapters on the Pilakas and other Sanskrit Buddhist texts. We have no doubt that this work will be generously received by the scholars interested in Buddhism.