The Hermetica

The Lost Wisdom of the Pharaohs

The Hermetica

An accessible translation of the esoteric Greco-Egyptian writings attributed to the legendary sage-god Hermes Trismegistus offers insight into their influence on some of history's forefront philosophers, scientists, and artists; in a volume that is complemented by an introduction to related Egyptian and Hellenic cultures. Original.

Hermetica

The Greek Corpus Hermeticum and the Latin Asclepius in a New English Translation, with Notes and Introduction

Hermetica

The Hermetica are a body of mystical texts written in late antiquity, but believed during the Renaissance (when they became well known) to be much older. Their supposed author, a mythical figure named Hermes Trismegistus, was thought to be a contemporary of Moses. The Hermetic philosophy was regarded as an ancient theology, parallel to the revealed wisdom of the Bible, supporting Biblical revelation and culminating in the Platonic philosophical tradition. This new translation is the only English version based on reliable texts, and Professor Copenhaver's introduction and notes make this accessible and up-to-date edition an indispensable resource to scholars.

The Hermetica of Elysium

The Hermetica of Elysium

1494 Barcelona. As Torquemada lights the fires of religious fervor throughout the cities of Spain, accused heretics are not the only victims. Thousands of books and manuscripts are lost to the flames as the Black Friars attempt to purge Europe of the ancient secrets of the gods and the bold new ideas that are ushering in the Renaissance. Nadira lives a dreary life as servant to a wealthy spice merchant until the night a dying scholar is brought to the merchant's stable, beaten by mercenaries who are on the hunt for The Hermetica of Elysium. To Nadira, words are her life: she lives them as her master's scrivener and dreams them in her mother's poetry. She is pursued as passionately as the fabled manuscript for her rare skill as a reader of Ancient Greek, Latin, Arabic and Hebrew that makes her valuable to men who pursue the book to exploit its magic. Kidnapped by Baron Montrose, an adventurous nobleman, she is forced to read from the Hermetica. It is soon revealed to her that ideas and words are more powerful than steel or fire for within its pages are the words that incite the Dominicans to religious fervor, give the Templars their power and reveal the lost mysteries of Elysium. As Nadira begins her transformation from servant to sorceress, will she escape the fires of the Inquisition, the clutches of the Borgia pope, Alexander VI and the French king, Charles VIII? And will Montrose's growing fear of her powers cause her to lose her chance for love?

The Corpus Hermeticum: Initiation Into Hermetics, the Hermetica of Hermes Trismegistus (Hardcover)

The Corpus Hermeticum: Initiation Into Hermetics, the Hermetica of Hermes Trismegistus (Hardcover)

This complete edition of the Corpus Hermeticum, which introduces in eighteen chapters the religious and philosophical principles of Hermetics, was translated by G. R. S. Mead. Hermetics is a religious, philosophical, and esoteric practice based around the beliefs and writings of the pagan priest Hermes Trismegistus. Influential for its distinct beliefs and characteristics, Hermeticism carried a profound influence over the Renaissance in Europe. Many Christian believers paid it heed, with much art depicting the Hermetic belief system appearing between the 14th and 17th centuries in particular. Notably, Hermetics claims to be a descended version of the prisca theologia - a principle which affirms there is but one, true theology in the world. This essence of the divine is present in all religions, and was according to legend given to mankind in distant antiquity. This belief, discussed by Hermes Trismegistus, has led many scholars of philosophy and religion to examine Hermetics in detail.

Hermetica

Hermetica

First published in 1924, this classic four-volume work contains various Greek and Latin writings of religious or philosophic teachings ascribed to Hermes Trismegistus, with Walter Scott's extensive notes, commentary, and addenda. It is said that these teachings are records of private, intimate talks between a teacher and one or two of his disciples. The setting was in Egypt under the Roman Empire, among men who had received some instruction in Greek philosophy, and especially the Platonism of the period, but were not content with merely accepting and repeating the dogmas of the orthodox philosophic religion that would better satisfy their needs. Included here are alchemical writings in Greek and Latin about the Hermetica, as well as addenda and indices compiled after Scott's death. Volumes I, II, and III of Hermetica, which contain Scott's translation, his notes on the Corpus Hermeticum, and his commentary on Asclepius and the Hermetic excerpts of Stobaeus, are also published by Shambhala.

Atlantis Rising 109 - January/February 2015

Atlantis Rising 109 - January/February 2015

PROTOSCIENCE Free Energy...Gravity Control...Alternative Science... Weather Control: The Ultimate Weapon of Mass Destruction By Jerry Decker THE FORBIDDEN ARCHAEOLOGIST The Mutation Time Problem for Human Origin By Michael Cremo MEDIA Magical Egypt Series The Popular Ancient Mystery Documentaries Back for Encore By Vanese Mcneill ALTERNATIVE ARCHAEOLOGY Return to Rock Lake Wisconsin's "Sunken Pyramid" Continues to Raise Questions By Frank Joseph ANCIENT MYSTERIES Mysterious Missionaries So, Who Were the Globetrotting Teachers of the Ancients? By Susan B. Martinez, Ph.D. LOST HISTORY The Friar Who Discovered America The Amazing Adventures of Nicholas of Lynne By Steven Sora ALTERNATIVE HISTORY The Writing on the Wall? Uncovering the Trail of Ancients Letters? By William B. Stoecker ANCIENT WISDOM Lost Truth The Enduring Search for the Long-Lost Prisca Theologia By Robert Schoch, Ph.D. THE OTHER SIDE Exploring Purgatory Surprising Possibilities for the Afterlife By Michael E. Tymn OTHER WORLDS Once Upon a Time in Inner Space Locating the Lost Lineage of the Ancient Astronaut Hypothesis By Martin Ruggles DEBUNKING DEBUNKING Self-Fulfilling Skepticism Why Some Researchers Will Not See the Light By Brendan D. Murphy HOLISTIC HEALTH The Miracle of Spontaneous Remission Medicine Can't Explain It ...but It Happens Anyway By Patrick Marsolek ASTROLOGY Vesta: A 'Planetoid'? Understanding Our Solar System's Latest Mystery Member By Julie Loar

The Wisdom of the Mystic East

Suhrawardi and Platonic Orientalism

The Wisdom of the Mystic East

An expert on the thought of medieval Islamic philosopher Suhrawardi argues that philosophers have romanticized this work as a revival of “oriental” wisdom.

The Egyptian Hermes

A Historical Approach to the Late Pagan Mind

The Egyptian Hermes

Sage, scientist, and sorcerer, Hermes Trismegistus was the culture-hero of Hellenistic and Roman Egypt. A human (according to some) who had lived about the time of Moses, but now indisputably a god, he was credited with the authorship of numerous books on magic and the supernatural, alchemy, astrology, theology, and philosophy. Until the early seventeenth century, few doubted the attribution. Even when unmasked, Hermes remained a byword for the arcane. Historians of ancient philosophy have puzzled much over the origins of his mystical teachings; but this is the first investigation of the Hermetic milieu by a social historian. Starting from the complex fusions and tensions that molded Graeco-Egyptian culture, and in particular Hermetism, during the centuries after Alexander, Garth Fowden goes on to argue that the technical and philosophical Hermetica, apparently so different, might be seen as aspects of a single "way of Hermes." This assumption that philosophy and religion, even cult, bring one eventually to the same goal was typically late antique, and guaranteed the Hermetica a far-flung readership, even among Christians. The focus and conclusion of this study is an assault on the problem of the social milieu of Hermetism.

TechGnosis

Myth, Magic, and Mysticism in the Age of Information

TechGnosis

How does our fascination with technology intersect with the religious imagination? In TechGnosis—a cult classic now updated and reissued with a new afterword—Erik Davis argues that while the realms of the digital and the spiritual may seem worlds apart, esoteric and religious impulses have in fact always permeated (and sometimes inspired) technological communication. Davis uncovers startling connections between such seemingly disparate topics as electricity and alchemy; online roleplaying games and religious and occult practices; virtual reality and gnostic mythology; programming languages and Kabbalah. The final chapters address the apocalyptic dreams that haunt technology, providing vital historical context as well as new ways to think about a future defined by the mutant intermingling of mind and machine, nightmare and fantasy.