Time of Contempt

Witcher 2 – Now a major Netflix show

Time of Contempt

Geralt the Witcher has fought monsters and demons across the land, but even he may not be prepared for what is happening to his world. The kings and armies are maneuvering for position, each fearing invasion from across the river, each fearing their neighbours more. Intrigue, dissent and rebellion are on all sides. The Elves and other non-humans are still suffering under decades of repression, and growing numbers join the commando units hidden deep in the forest, striking at will and then dissolving into the trees. The Magicians are fighting amongst themselves, some in the pay of the kings, some sympathetic to the elves. And against this backdrop of fear and contempt Geralt and his lover Yennefer must protect Ciri, orphaned heir and sought by all sides. For the prophecy rests on her, and whether she lives or dies she has the power to save the world - or perhaps end it.

Love in the Time of Contempt

Consolations for Parents of Teenagers

Love in the Time of Contempt

In Love in the Time of Contempt Joanne Fedler won’t tell you how to be the ‘perfect’ parent. She’s not a psychologist or an academic. But she is the mother of two teenagers, and she knows how it feels to be the parent of someone sprouting hair, tits and attitude all over the place. This is a gritty, hilarious look at the day-to-day interactions with teenagers, and the tussled, frazzled and complex business of remaining mature while supporting someone to become an adult. Fedler shares her philosophy that we are meant to parent imperfectly – our mistakes are the start of the important conversations we need to have with our kids. She guides us through enduring intermittent bouts of contempt and not taking it personally, picking the fights that are worth having, and surviving the journey from frustration, to confusion, to elation and back again. Love in the Time of Contempt is a funny, poignant account of the dramas and delights of parenting people who know it all, who don’t yet have a fully functioning brain and who desperately need us to parent them – just not in the way we’re used to. ‘With perhaps the most apt title of any work about teens ever written, this book beautifully elucidates the challenges, heartbreak and hysteria of losing our babies and enduring their awkward metamorphosis to adulthood. I found myself nodding, laughing, wincing, and wondering how the hell Jo smuggled the hidden cameras into my home.’ — Kerri Sackville ‘Extremely insightful, honest and engaging…an outstanding overview of how to understand the world of the teenager today.’ — Dani Klein, Psychologist

The Witcher Boxed Set: Blood of Elves, The Time of Contempt, Baptism of Fire

The Witcher Boxed Set: Blood of Elves, The Time of Contempt, Baptism of Fire

Soon to be a major Netflix original series! This special boxed set includes the first three novels in Andrzej Sapkowski's NYT bestselling epic fantasy saga -- the books that introduced the world to The Witcher and inspired the hit video games. For over a century, humans, dwarves, gnomes, and elves have lived together in relative peace. But times have changed, the uneasy peace is over, and now the races are fighting once again. The only good elf, it seems, is a dead elf. Geralt of Rivia, the cunning assassin known as The Witcher, has been waiting for the birth of a prophesied child. This child has the power to change the world - for good, or for evil. As the threat of war hangs over the land and the child is hunted for her extraordinary powers, it will become Geralt's responsibility to protect them all -- and the Witcher never accepts defeat. In Blood of Elves, The Time of Contempt, and Baptism of Fire, Sapkowski brings a fresh new voice to fantasy fiction, creating something wholly dark and exciting in this world of monsters and witchers.

Government, Justice, and Contempt

Government, Justice, and Contempt

This is both a rigorous and accessible book which leads the reader to search for personal answers to his or her everyday questions and uneasiness. Many people are inclined to think, on certain occasions, that if everyone in our society pursued his or her own projects without harming others, or preventing them from realizing their own pursuits, then each one of us would be living the happiest life possible. The author of this work is guided by the intuition that it should not be necessary to know if a particular act is in itself just or unjust, or if its consequences will be the least harmful, in order to know whether or not we would be doing something unjust in producing it. Immediate decisions demand a knowledge of another point of reference which provides an amount of certainty about an action void of injustice. This book tries to offer possible answers to questions of government's involvement, concrete and abstract, with individual pursuit of happiness and the implications of free agency. Much is expected of a government and an individual must separate illusion from justified complaint-or praise. Contents: The Impossible Government; Injustice and Contempt; Justice and the 'Sufficient'Reasons; Contempt and Liberty; Justice and the Happy Life; What Could Citizens Expect From Their Governments?

In Contempt of Congress

Postwar Press Coverage on Capitol Hill

In Contempt of Congress

Still, the public remains skeptical, indeed hostile, toward this most representative national institution. Rozell finds that much of the blame goes to highly negative press coverage of the Congress, and government in general, and that while Congress has always been a favorite target of critics and comedians, healthy skepticism has now largely been replaced by a debilitating cynicism that undermines the foundations of representative government.

Echoes of Contempt

A History of Judeophobia and the Christian Church

Echoes of Contempt

Echoes of Contempt is an engaging and vivid account of the tragic history of the church’s relationship with Jewish communities over two millennia. Beginning with the Jerusalem house church, the book traces that history through medieval pogroms and the Parisian salons of the Enlightenment, right up to the present-day focus on the Israel/Palestine conflict. Drawing on a wide range of sources and his own extensive knowledge, the author shows that, far from being something new, Judeophobia is a recycling of misinformation, prejudice, and hatred. The old lies are echoed in the present at political rallies, church conferences, and in classrooms. While the book is accessible to those who have very little previous knowledge of the subject, it is well-researched and retains a sophisticated approach. It is more than a reminder of the church’s complicity in the centuries of contempt that led to Auschwitz—it is a call to action. It will challenge many to think again.